Reviews

The Necromancer’s Prison

She wanted to find her place in the universe. She never imagined it might not be on Earth.

When Emily Murphy over slept the morning of her college entrance exam, she thought missing her test was the worst thing that could happen. She never expected she would wind up lost halfway across the galaxy, battling aliens with laser guns and mages hurling lightning.

Like most seventeen year olds, Emily’s main concern had been navigating the perils of high school, not surviving shootouts and sorcery. That changed when her school was attacked and a student was kidnapped. While everyone else smartly fled from danger, she recklessly ran toward it mounting an impossible rescue that would lead her on a journey unlike anything she could have imagined.

Dropped into a strange world teeming with merciless criminals and ruthless aristocrats, surrounded by violence and betrayal, Emily must untangle a web of intrigue and deceit to solve the mystery behind the abduction, save her classmate, and discover the destiny which awaits her.

It is either that, or die trying…


What an absolutely fun read.

I had no expectations when I picked this one up, just excitement and hope. A debut novel that mixed three of my favorite things: YA, Fantasy, and Sci-Fi? Yeah, I was down for the ride, and I was not disappointed.

The Necromancer’s Prison has a lot of strengths going for it. For one, the mix of genres feels fresh and unique. More and more in YA, and fantasy in general, I see magic and aliens/technology being mixed and connected in some way. It’s such a cool effect. Because of this, there are tropes and plot points in the book that feel fresh if only because of this interesting perspective. The mix of genres also mixes the reader’s expectations and kept me on my toes the entire time, wondering what would happen next.

Second, I felt a particular fondness for the main character, Emily. She is a smart, strong, determined, young woman and even when she didn’t know what to do, I never felt that she (or the writer) were taking the easy way out with any of her choices. Even the side characters were written so well; the banter and spectrum of relationships between them felt so natural and real. At their core, Whitesell’s characters are relatable as hell and you find yourself rooting for them easily throughout the book.

Lastly, I have to commend the author for how he kept the pace of the plot moving throughout the whole book. Sometimes in big concept books like this the middle does this thing where it- drags, I guess. The exposition gets too heavy and things slow down. Not in this book. The Necromancer’s Prison kept things fast, tight, and quick. The plot was thoughtful and clever and I found myself reading faster and faster as I got through the book. The writing is compelling and engaging and, most of all, I think that’s what made this book such a fun and entertaining read.

Overall, this was such a strong debut novel for Whitesell and I enjoyed it a lot. The Necromancer’s Prison is creative and explosive, action-packed and full of faceted characters. If you’re a Sci-Fi/Fantasy fan, definitely go check this one out. You won’t be disappointed.

A big thanks to Alec Whitesell for providing me with a review copy of his book in exchange for an honest review! I had so much fun reading it and I look forward to reading whatever you write next.


See you tomorrow, folks! x

Find more recommendations on: Instagram | Twitter Facebook | Goodreads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s